• The HR Specialist - Print Newsletter
  • HR Specialist: Employment Law
  • The HR LAW Weekly
  • The HR Weekly

Personnel Files

Help employees protect their identity from theft

06/01/2000

Q. A few employees have complained that we use their Social Security numbers as their ID numbers. They’re concerned about potential theft of their identity. Is it legal for employers to use Social Security numbers for ID purposes? —D.T., Illinois

Subcontracting I-9 work won’t end your liability

06/01/2000

Q. We own a chain of restaurants. It has been a challenge for us to complete all of the I-9 forms and keep up with reverification of expired work authorizations. Is it legal for us to hire a company to handle these tasks for us? —A.M., Tennessee

Boost your immigration IQ

05/01/2000
There are six million illegal immigrants in the United States and tough federal sanctions against businesses that hire them. But your business can benefit from federal immigration law by taking advantage …

Don’t embellish reasons for firing

04/01/2000
When a financial services firm terminates an employee, it must file a Form U-5 outlining the reasons for the firing. While those statements have some immunity …

Don’t fear distress caused by proper investigations

03/01/2000
You don’t have to worry that the target of your harassment investigation will turn around and sue you for emotional distress. The 2nd Circuit said he …

What should we do with unsolicited résumés?

02/01/2000
Q. We get numerous unsolicited résumés through email and regular mail. Do we have any duty toward these individuals? Do we have any obligation to keep the materials they send?

Protect your business from ‘identity theft’

01/01/2000

Identity theft is one of the nation’s fastest-growing crimes, and it can hit businesses as well as individuals.
A thief uses your credit card, Social Security number or business identification …

Tell employee of subpoena for personnel file

01/01/2000

Q. We recently received a subpoena to produce the contents of an employee’s personnel file in connection with a lawsuit. The employee is a party to the lawsuit, but the company is not. Do we have to comply with the subpoena? Should we tell the employee about the subpoena? —K.H., District of Columbia