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Insurance

Misinformation may result in back benefits

02/04/2019
When employees get erroneous information about unemployment compensation eligibility and don’t file as a result, they may be eligible for back payments when they do file.

Ensure workers’ compensation appeal is received—not sent—within 30 days

02/04/2019
According to a recent Minnesota Supreme Court decision, the appeal must have actually been received by the chief administrative law judge and the Commissioner of Labor and Industry by 4:30 p.m. on a state business day within 30 days after the party was served with the compensation judge’s decision.

Go to jail, get fired, collect unemployment anyway

01/31/2019
Employees who engage in misconduct generally aren’t eligible for unemployment benefits. But that doesn’t mean a blanket rule that calls for firing anyone who is incarcerated will automatically rule out unemployment compensation.

4 key benefit trends to watch for in 2019

01/25/2019
Some of the benefit trends to watch this year, according to the Society for Human Resource Management.

Help staff cope with annual deductible reset

01/15/2019
Tracy Watts, senior partner in the Mercer consulting firm’s health insurance practice, recommends offering tips to help employees better manage their out-of-pocket expenses.

Employees with HDHPs more engaged in their care

01/08/2019
Employees enrolled in high-deductible health plans are significantly more engaged in their health care than employees who have lower deductibles.

Court: ACA requires plans to cover gender reassignment

01/02/2019
A recent decision by the federal court in charge of Minnesota cases has ruled that health plans that exclude gender reassignment coverage violate the Affordable Care Act.

Advise unemployment authorities if you are still paying commissions to former employee

01/02/2019
If a former employee is collecting on your unemployment account, be sure to let the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development know, so it can adjust the benefit amount.

Key question for unemployment benefits: Did employee quit or was he fired?

11/28/2018
Employees who quit their jobs aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation benefits. But if the employee believed the employer had already terminated him, then not showing up for work won’t count as quitting. He may be eligible for benefits.

Child-care needs may qualify for unemployment

11/28/2018
Employees who lose access to child-care services and who request an accommodation from their employer in order to keep working are eligible for unemployment benefits if their employer does not make the accommodation and the employee has to quit because she can’t find alternative care.