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Payroll

September 2019: Employer’s business tax calendar

07/31/2019
Here’s your monthly guide to critical payroll due dates.

IRS will allow shortened SSNs on employees’ W-2 forms

07/25/2019
Starting in 2021, the IRS will permit employers to shorten Social Security numbers that are printed on employees’ W-2 wage statements.

EEO-1 portal opens for pay data collection

07/25/2019
The EEOC has opened the web portal employers must use to report compensation data required by the much-delayed component 2 of the annual EEO-1 report.

Oh no, anything but the permanent record!

07/24/2019
The federal FMLA doesn’t cover employees who take time off for school visits or to care for kids who aren’t seriously ill but who must stay home from school. That’s the province of state laws.

Court rules California’s auto-IRA program is legal

07/18/2019
A federal trial court has ruled that California’s Secure Choices law—which mandates that small employers that don’t already have retirement plans enroll employees into auto-deduction IRAs and withhold the contributions from their pay—isn’t an ERISA-covered retirement plan.

W-2 Box 9: On again, off again

07/18/2019
The 2019 W-2 is largely unchanged. Box 9, however, is again shaded out.

In the Payroll Mailbag: August ‘19

07/18/2019
Breaking down an employee’s travel time … Three questions on figuring the regular rate of pay

Payroll FYI: General interest letters from the IRS

07/18/2019
The IRS is a prodigious publisher. Here are digests of three general interest letters.

Final regs cover duties of CPEOs and clients

07/18/2019
Final regulations firm up the requirements for certified professional employer organization status and also affect clients’ relationships with CPEOs.

Tales from tax protestor land: Revoke your visa right away

07/18/2019
You can’t tug on Superman’s cape, you can’t spit into the wind and you can’t mess around with income tax withholding. This message seems to have slipped by one individual taxpayer and one business taxpayer, both of whom ended up in the IRS’ cross hairs.