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Communication

Notify workers quickly that leave counts toward Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) time.

07/01/2000
The 6th Circuit has endorsed a Labor Department regulation that says a company can’t count time under the FMLA unless it notifies the worker, within two days …

One tough, tearful job evaluation doesn’t equal emotional distress

04/01/2000
On Michael Jarrard’s first day back to work at United Parcel Service (UPS) after six weeks of leave for psychiatric care, his supervisor gave him a harsh 20-page …

Limit sensitive meetings to ‘need-to-know’ managers

03/01/2000
During a management meeting, an operations director warned Karen Bishop, a human resources manager, not to share information with another employee whom …

Don’t ban employees from discussing a co-worker’s health

03/01/2000
Jolene Conn, a security guard at Lockheed Martin Astronautics, developed a medical condition that made it hard to carry a gun …

You can recoup loss for payroll error

03/01/2000

Q. We direct-deposit the wages and salaries of most of our employees. Last week, two checks for the same pay period were deposited into an employee’s account. Can we legally have the bank withdraw the extra funds from the employee’s account? —M.F., California

More firms crack down on employee use of the Web

02/01/2000
Nearly a third of employers, 31 percent, now monitor and/or restrict employee Internet use, according to a Vault.com survey. Approaches range from restricting …

Notify employees before stripping unused vacation

02/01/2000

Q. Can we require employees to forfeit vacation time that they don’t use within a certain period? —G.J., Massachusetts

Tell employee of subpoena for personnel file

01/01/2000

Q. We recently received a subpoena to produce the contents of an employee’s personnel file in connection with a lawsuit. The employee is a party to the lawsuit, but the company is not. Do we have to comply with the subpoena? Should we tell the employee about the subpoena? —K.H., District of Columbia