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Employment Law

Don’t let your policy create an end run for disabled employees

01/01/2000

Denver’s employment system blocked police officers and firefighters from being reassigned directly to other jobs in city government. They had to compete with noncity employees for jobs.
But that didn’t …

Beware of requiring lengthy travel without paying for worker’s time

01/01/2000
As a refrigerator and utility mechanic, David Kavanagh traveled to more than 50 stores. Although his employer paid him for travel time during the day, it didn’t cover his commute to …

Protect job applicants’ answer sheets from written tests

01/01/2000
Applicants had to pass three tests to be considered for a quality helper position at a Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co. (3M) plant. Mary Austin failed all three.
She claims …

Transfer may not trigger clock on discrimination, retaliation claims

01/01/2000
Frank Dorsey’s transfer from flight training supervisor to assistant chief pilot was the first step in a United Parcel Service (UPS) plan “to deliver the ‘coup de gr ^ace’ to his …

Protect your business from ‘identity theft’

01/01/2000

Identity theft is one of the nation’s fastest-growing crimes, and it can hit businesses as well as individuals.
A thief uses your credit card, Social Security number or business identification …

Jury smells a rat in firing of disabled man

01/01/2000
A regional manager’s decision to fire a mentally disabled janitor cost the Chuck E. Cheese’s pizza chain plenty of dough. A jury awarded the janitor back pay and damages of more …

Firing ex-mistress is OK

01/01/2000
If need be, you may be able to fire your ex-mistress. In one New York case, the guy decided to reconcile with his wife but she didn’t want him to work …

17 steps to protect your trade secrets

01/01/2000
Protecting your company’s trade secrets is important for two reasons: You’ll make it less likely that confidential information will be misappropriated. It will be easier for you to …

Tell employee of subpoena for personnel file

01/01/2000

Q. We recently received a subpoena to produce the contents of an employee’s personnel file in connection with a lawsuit. The employee is a party to the lawsuit, but the company is not. Do we have to comply with the subpoena? Should we tell the employee about the subpoena? —K.H., District of Columbia

Prepare managers for EEOC inquiry

01/01/2000

Q. A former employee recently filed a complaint against my company with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging race discrimination. As part of its investigation, the agency will be coming to our offices to interview employees. Do I have to make these employees available? Can I sit in on the employee interviews? —D.N., Colorado