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Productivity / Performance

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Uncover the real reason for poor performance


Whether you’re giving an oral warning to a new hire or issuing a last chance to a veteran employee who is on thin ice, there’s one step you must take before you discipline: Pinpoint exactly why the employee isn’t performing appropriately.

Calling a time-out on the real March Madness


Working professionals surveyed for a recent OfficeTeam poll said they spend an average of 25.5 minutes per day on sports-related activities in the office during the college basketball playoffs.

Annual reviews: Most popular, least effective


The most common frequency for performance reviews continues to be annually.  However, HR professionals say that reviews offer a more accurate appraisal of an employees’ performance when those reviews are conducted more frequently.

Ultimate lawsuit preventive: Proof of poor performance


Employers that track poor performance and can clearly justify reasons for discharge rarely lose lawsuits. That’s because, unless there is solid proof of bias, poor performance will always trump spurious arguments about alleged discrimination.

Good records get lawsuits dismissed fast


Employers that have well-documented business reasons for every discharge typically win lawsuits that allege discrimination. Good records force employees to prove that an allegedly legitimate reason for firing was a pretext for covering up discrimination.

‘Body cams’ for managers & employees: Is it time?


Body cams are now common among police, but some employers see them as a way to monitor performance and sort out he-said/she-said arguments.

Meet the new boss, who is entitled to set new expectations regardless of past measures


Sometimes, a long-term and apparently successful employee may not adjust well to a new supervisor—especially if that supervisor brings new or different performance expectations about the employee’s job.

Your good disciplinary records will almost always beat employee’s retaliation claim


If you are certain you can justify your action, don’t be afraid to discipline a worker who has filed a discrimination charge or otherwise opposed alleged discriminatory actions. Generally, courts give employers leeway to discipline as long as they believe they acted in good faith.

Factor disciplinary history into punishment


An employee with a prior disciplinary history may deserve more severe punishment for rule-breaking than a co-worker with a clean record. However, you must document that history and the role it played in your decision-making.

It’s an epidemic! More workers fake being sick


Just don’t feel like going into work today? You’re not alone, but be careful what you tell the boss. They’ve heard all the excuses.

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