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Retention

Conduct exit interviews only if they’d be fruitful

08/01/2003

Q. Is it wise to conduct exit interviews with all departing employees, even those who have been terminated on poor terms? —J.S., Georgia

Expand benefits lineup at little cost with ‘voluntary’ perks

08/01/2003
Issue: Benefit costs are rising, but you need to offer a competitive package to retain good workers.
Benefit: Voluntary benefits let you beef up your benefits without much additional cost. …

Ease bumpy workplace re-entry for returning reservists

08/01/2003
Issue: Reservists returning from war create special challenges for your work force and your organization.
Risk: Loss of productivity and distractions among staff; reservists may face challenges at work and …

Look to local colleges for training

08/01/2003
Issue: Community colleges provide high-quality employee training at a reasonable cost.
Benefit: Employees learn new skills and feel more loyal to your organization …

State law dictates your payroll frequency

07/01/2003

Q. Is it legal to adopt a once-a-month payroll for hourly employees? What other issues come up with a monthly payroll? —J.S., California

Keep employees growing … so they won’t leave

07/01/2003
Issue: “Intraplacement” involves the entire company in identifying job-growth opportunities for ready employees. Benefits: Boost retention, cut recruiting costs …

Focus on tangible perks to retain best workers

02/01/2003
Are HR professionals in tune with their employees’ wants and needs? Not exactly, suggests a survey of more than 1,000 employees and HR professionals by USA Today …

Commuting perks: New rules make them more attractive

02/01/2002
Although 86 percent of American workers feel that commuter assistance benefits, such as discount transit passes, ride-sharing boards or parking benefits, are beneficial, only 17 percent have access to such perks, …

Boost productivity, retention by helping staff with legal woes

12/01/2000
Employees spend an average of 53 hours on the job each year resolving their families’ legal issues, according to a new survey by Harris Interactive. The cost in lost productivity …