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HR Management

Moms may refuse workers’ comp treatment

01/01/2000
The American Red Cross tried to terminate or modify Colleen Curran’s workers’ compensation benefits when she refused to undergo medical treatment it considered reasonable.
But a workers’ comp judge found …

Protect your business from ‘identity theft’

01/01/2000

Identity theft is one of the nation’s fastest-growing crimes, and it can hit businesses as well as individuals.
A thief uses your credit card, Social Security number or business identification …

Tap OSHA online for training rules

01/01/2000
If you’re confused about how to comply with a federal safety regulation, or even whether it applies to your company, check out the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s online, interactive advisers. …

Jury smells a rat in firing of disabled man

01/01/2000
A regional manager’s decision to fire a mentally disabled janitor cost the Chuck E. Cheese’s pizza chain plenty of dough. A jury awarded the janitor back pay and damages of more …

Firing ex-mistress is OK

01/01/2000
If need be, you may be able to fire your ex-mistress. In one New York case, the guy decided to reconcile with his wife but she didn’t want him to work …

Judge how much of a pain ergonomics rules may be

01/01/2000
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is still accepting comments on its proposed ergonomics regulations until Feb. 1, but it wants to have the sweeping program in place by the …

17 steps to protect your trade secrets

01/01/2000
Protecting your company’s trade secrets is important for two reasons: You’ll make it less likely that confidential information will be misappropriated. It will be easier for you to …

Tell employee of subpoena for personnel file

01/01/2000

Q. We recently received a subpoena to produce the contents of an employee’s personnel file in connection with a lawsuit. The employee is a party to the lawsuit, but the company is not. Do we have to comply with the subpoena? Should we tell the employee about the subpoena? —K.H., District of Columbia

Prepare managers for EEOC inquiry

01/01/2000

Q. A former employee recently filed a complaint against my company with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging race discrimination. As part of its investigation, the agency will be coming to our offices to interview employees. Do I have to make these employees available? Can I sit in on the employee interviews? —D.N., Colorado

You may not need an affirmative action plan

01/01/2000

Q. Are all employers required to have affirmative action plans? —T.S., Maryland